Posts Tagged ‘Midcoast Maine’

BOOTHBAY HARBOR REGION HODGDON ISLAND INN BED AND BREAKFAST LOOKS FORWARD TO 2013 SEASON

January 31st, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Our beloved HII

Our beloved HII

Oh my goodness!  How time does fly?!  I cannot believe that we are into the first month of a new year!  Happy belated 2013!  Richard and I wish you and yours all that is good and great.

2012, like the years before it, had its fair share of things to celebrate and its moments of sadness.  Here in our little corner of the world those moments ranged from that of an earthquake registering 2.4 on the Richter Scale whose epicenter was three miles north of Boothbay Harbor to the sinking of the HMS Bounty in Hurricane Sandy and to the grand opening of the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences; from a local girl, Eleanor “Ellie” Logan, earning her second Olympic gold medal to the Boothbay Harbor Region Chamber of Commerce celebrating its 50th anniversary along with its very own 50th annual Windjammer Days Festival; and lastly to the lobstermen of mid coast Maine surviving one of the worst gluts on the market due to warm weather conditions last spring which interrupted the lobster’s normal life cycle doubling the number of lobsters on the market.

We are very thankful to be here in Boothbay at our beloved Hodgdon Island Inn and preparing to launch Season 4.  Season 4 – we can hardly believe it as it seems like only yesterday we rolled into town, zipped past the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens on Barters Island Road, bounced across the old Knickerkane bridge (which has since been replaced by our beautiful new bridge) and pulled into the driveway at HII unsure of what awaited us, but fast-forward three seasons which include welcoming guests and alumni from all across the country and all around the world, creating thousands of breakfasts and desserts, making hundreds of beds and being part of so many magic moments called memories.

The 2013 season?  Bring it on!! :-)

Innkeepers’s note:  Hodgdon Island Inn will be open March 1 – November 17, 2013.  Reservations can be made online at http://www.boothbaybb.com.  Should you have a question, or need to speak with us, we can be reached via voicemail at 1-800-314-5160 or by e-mail stay@boothbaybb.com  We would love to have the opportunity of welcoming you to our tiny little island getaway here on the mid coast of Maine.

HODGDON ISLAND INN B&B BOOTHBAY HARBOR REGION AND HURRICANE SANDY

October 31st, 2012 by richard-pamela-riley

Driving rain and gale-force winds at HII during Sandy

Richard and I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you who have texted, e-mailed and/or called us during the last two days to check up on us here at Hodgdon Island Inn – we are greatly touched by your care and concern!  It has kept us strong as we prepared for and waited out Hurricane Sandy.  By the same token, we hope that all of you, our HII Alumni, your families, friends and relatives are safe.  For those of you in areas devastated by Hurricane Sandy, know that your friends in the Boothbay Harbor Region of mid coast Maine, are keeping you in our thoughts and prayers as we follow the latest developments.

We are able to report that the inn along with the rest of the region is in pretty good shape, albeit a bit soggy and windblown.  We once again have power and internet thanks to the dedicated and hardworking teams at Central Maine Power and Time Warner Cable.

HMS Bounty at the Boothbay Harbor Shipyard, October, 2012

It is with sadness, however, that we offer our deepest and most sincere sympathy to all the families, friends, colleagues and fellow sailors of the HMS Bounty.  Fourteen crew members were rescued; one crew member is dead and another missing after a replica of the historic HMS Bounty, overhauled in recent years at the Boothbay Harbor Shipyard, sank off the coast of North Carolina yesterday. The ship was well-known in Maine, where it had visited several ports this summer before docking at the Boothbay yard for some minor repairs.

The HMS Bounty replica was built in 1960, and was featured in the 1962 film “Mutiny on the Bounty,” starring Marlon Brando, and was also was used in “Treasure Island” in 1989 and two of the “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies.  Its permanent home was in Florida.

HODGDON ISLAND INN, BOOTHBAY ONLY AN HOUR FROM OWL’S HEAD TRANSPORTATION MUSEUM

October 6th, 2012 by richard-pamela-riley

Sled

Join Us For Our Final Event of The Outdoor Season

More than 150 antique automobiles from around the world will rally at the Owls Head Transportation Museum Saturday and Sunday, October 6 & 7, for the Museum’s annual Foreign Auto Festival and Antique Aeroplane Show.
This annual event attracts pre-1992 foreign car enthusiasts from all over the state-from luxury sedans to the high-performance sports cars. The variety can be impressive: Austin Healey, MG, Triumph, Porsche, Ferrari, Citroen, Mercedes, BMW, Rolls Royce, Bentley, Jaguar and more. The meet draws a large number of Japanese models as well. Owners of pre-1992 cars and trucks (of any make) are welcome to exhibit at this and all other Museum (non-auction) events at no charge. Visitors are encouraged to come early to guarantee seeing the highest concentration of exhibiting vehicles
This year MG is the featured marque. MGs of any year are welcome to exhibit on Runway 17 for free. Free admission includes the driver and one passenger.

 

FALL FOLIAGE SPECIAL – AUTUMN IN BOOTHBAY

September 25th, 2012 by richard-pamela-riley

Celebrate the fall season and take in the splendid fall colors – using the Hodgdon Island Inn Bed & Breakfast as your “Mid-coast Maine home base”, you can spend a day “Down East”, north or South, exploring state parks and coastal towns, museums and historic sites, lighthouses, go antiquing or outlet shopping, or just take a walk through the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens or our nearby nature trail, Porter Preserve – it’s all here for the doing and within a driving time from just minutes to a little over an hour.

Book your choice of room 1, 3,5, 7 or 8 for a three-night stay anytime during October or November and we’ll give you a 50% discount off your third night. These rooms at Hodgdon Island Inn have very comfortable king-size beds, private baths, in-room refrigerators, hair dryers, and water views. A full gourmet breakfast is served every morning and delicious homemade desserts are offered each evening. The inn offers secure parking, is minutes from Boothbay Harbor and seconds from the area’s best lobster rolls.

Exclusions: Special rate does not apply for one or two-night stays; offer cannot be used with any other specials and is based on availability and double occupancy. 7% Maine State Lodging Tax is extra. Please mention this package at the time of booking or include in the comments section when booking on line.

Offer applies only to stays from October 1 – November 17, 2013.

BOOTHBAY HARBOR REGION CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FIRST ANNUAL CLAW DOWN TO KICK OFF RESTAURANT WEEK 2012

September 19th, 2012 by richard-pamela-riley

First Annual Claw Down Chef’s “Lobster Bite” Competition

Wednesday, September 19, 2012, 6:00-8:00 p.m., The Opera House at Boothbay Harbor

 

ClawJoin us for a memorable evening at the Opera House with Emcee Lynn Archer, (a.k.a. The Queen of Clubs), owner of the Brass Compass Cafe and winner of the “Lobster Dekkah” challenge on the Food Network Show: Throwdown with Bobby Flay

 

Be there when local chefs vie for the best “Lobster Bite” to be determined by three renowned judges:

  • Meredith Goad, Portland Press Herald food writer “Soup to Nuts” column
  • Dane Somers, Executive Director of the Maine Lobster Promotion Council
  • Kelly Patrick Farrin, 2010 Maine Lobster Chef of the Year, Sous Chef at Primo restaurant, Rockland.

Cast your vote for the people’s choice award and sample savory lobster bites from the following restaurants:

 

  • The Boathouse Bistro  & Tapas Bar
  • Boothbay Lobster Wharf
  • Brown’s Wharf
  • Davis Island Grill
  • Fisherman’s Wharf Restaurant and Lounge on Pier 6
  • McSeagull’s Restaurant
  • Newagen Seaside Inn
  • Oliver’s at Cozy Harbor
  • Ports of Italy
  • Robinson’s Wharf & Tug’s Pub
  • Rocktide Inn and Restaurant
  • The Lobster Dock
  • The Thistle Inn
  • The World is Mine Oyster
  • Tugboat Inn and Restaurant
  • Under Currach Tavern
  • Windows on the Harbor

COASTAL MAINE INNKEEPER’S WINTERTIME REMINISCENCES, RESOLUTIONS, RECIPES AND WRITING BLOGS – PART ONE

February 15th, 2011 by richard-pamela-riley

Our "Old Kentucky Home", the Piatt-Fowler House, circa 1817

It’s Friday, February 11, 2011, the sun is shining, the sky is bright blue, the water is deep, dark blue, the temperature has warmed up to 14 degrees (Fahrenheit, that is) and I find myself sitting at my desk looking out at the receding snow piles that once stood 10 feet high and looked liked lookout posts for our fortress.  It’s beautiful!  But life does go at a slower pace here in the winter than where we came from (the bluegrass state) and it gives one more time to reflect …

This morning over breakfast (which by the way was Oatmeal Brule with blueberries, walnuts and bananas), Richard and I were reminiscing about where we were and what we were doing this time last year?  Now, we do have to admit that parts of last year went by in a bit of a blur, but this particular week we can recall with perfect clarity!

Moving Day! Of course, Mother Nature does not always cooperate ...

We were back in Kentucky, packing up the last of our belongings while our moving crew was simultaneously beginning to load said belongings.  Of course, Mother Nature does not always cooperate, and while this move was underway, we had some serious snow.  So serious in fact that they couldn’t get the moving truck up our old driveway to the Piatt-Fowler House and the movers had to resort to using a small rent-a-truck to shuttle loads out, but of course it didn’t stop snowing in between loads and every time, Richard and the guys had to dig the shuttle out.  We hoped it wasn’t an omen … at the end of the second day; everything was onboard except for our second car (which we had packed with everything from Richard’s paintings to the large antique family portraits).  As we stood in the cold, pitch black of night being whipped with blinding snow watching our car being crept up two narrow planks into the dark cavern of the moving van, I finally understood the expression: “my heart was in my throat”.  It all seemed so unreal, surreal and not to mention scary!

Unloading the car was a different story ... going into the truck my heart was in my throat!

The next couple of days were indeed unreal as we said good-bye to family and friends and began the 1,060 mile trek, with our beloved feline companion, Charlie Darlie, to our new home in Mid Coast Maine.

Thankfully we, our belongings and the fantastic North American Van Lines crew arrived safely in Boothbay and on Saturday, February 13th.  Richard went up to meet the truck and guide them to Hodgdon Island Inn.  He said then, and again this morning, that the sight which greeted him is one that he would never forget: 

It caused quite a commotion in Boothbay!

there was this huge moving van straddling the side of Route 27 as close as was possible to the Civil War monument right in the middle of Boothbay Common!  As you can imagine, it caused quite a commotion, especially as they made their way down Barter’s Island Road past the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens (www.mainegardens.org), over the bridge and onto our tiny little island, but I’ll save that story for another day …

The perfect end to the 1,060 mile trek from the bluegrass state to the pine tree state.

GROUNDHOG DAY, Nor’easters and Tiny Little Islands in Maine

January 31st, 2011 by richard-pamela-riley

The view from Barters Island, Maine

Our tiny little island in Maine

Oh my!  Looking at the calendar this morning I realized that Wednesday is February 2nd or more, importantly, it is Groundhog Day in the USA.

Now, we all know that the nation’s official groundhog lives in Punxsutawney, PA – hence the name Punxsutawney Phil and that if he sees his shadow when he climbs out of his burrow at Gobbler’s Knob, there will be six more weeks of winter weather.  If he does not see his shadow, there will be an early spring.

Thinking about Phil, I realized that I had not seen one of his species in Midcoast Maine since Richard (my husband) and I relocated to Hodgdon Island Inn last year. I have seen gulls, loons, geese, crows, eagles, osprey, seals, red foxes, wild turkeys, red squirrels, grey squirrels, porcupines, lobsters and the occasional Maine Coon cat in my travels around Boothbay, Boothbay Harbor, Wiscasset and Damariscotta, but no groundhogs!

My curiosity got the better of me so I called up my favorite search engine and went looking for “groundhog day in Maine”.  Boy did I get a surprise! 

Storm surge

Storm surge in Boothbay Maine

Up popped information on what was termed “a notable nor’easter” aka The Groundhog Day Gale of 1976.  When all was said and done there were no deaths as a result of this massive four-day long storm, but it ravaged the coastal areas of Maine and left behind over $2M worth of damage.

Apparently it all started when an upper cyclone was stationary on January 28 across the Desert Southwest of the United States.  A system in the northern branch of the Westerlies known as a Saskatchewan Screamer, similar to an Alberta clipper, moved east-southeast across Canada beginning on January 30, luring the system in the United States eastward. The cyclones merged by February 2, becoming a significant storm over New England before lifting northward through Quebec.  By February 6, the storm finally dissipated.

 In Maine, winds had gusted to 60 knots (69 mph) in Rockland and 100 knots (115 mph) at Southwest Harbor. Blizzard conditions were experienced for a few hours as the storm moved up into Canada. Coastal flooding was seen from Brunswick to Eastport.  A tidal surge went up the Penobscot River flooding Bangor for three hours.  About 200 cars were submerged and office workers were stranded until waters receded.

Oh my!  Now we knew, from our many previous visits to Maine dream-hunting, that Nor’easters usually occur in Maine in the months between October and April, and we were also aware that they can form at any time of the year.  What we didn’t know was just how long a shadow good ol’ Punxsutawney Phil can cast!

Nor'easter at work

The term "nor'easter" is often used to refer to any strong rain or snow storm that occurs in the northeastern US

I must admit, that as I check the weather updates this afternoon, I am looking at the predicted storm which is supposed to hit us here on our tiny little island in Maine on Wednesday a little differently than I did yesterday.  I wish all of us (especially Phil) a very overcast Groundhog Day 2011!