Posts Tagged ‘Fat Tuesday pancake recipe’

HODGDON ISLAND INN INNKEEPER SHARES FAVORITE FAT TUESDAY RECIPE

March 5th, 2014 by richard-pamela-riley

CARAMEL CAKE PANCAKES

Caramel Cake Pancakes with Caramel Sauce

Caramel Cake Pancakes with Caramel Sauce

Makes about 15 pancakes

 

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups self-rising flour

½ cup sugar

1 cup milk

2 large eggs

3 TBS butter, melted

2 tsp vanilla extract

Caramel Syrup

Whisk together first 2 ingredients in large bowl.  Whisk together milk and 3 ingredients in another bowl.  Gradually stir milk mixture into flour mixture just until dry ingredients are moistened. (For tender pancakes, don’t over mix the batter; it should be lumpy)

Heat griddle to 350 degrees.

Pour about ¼ cup batter for each pancake onto hot buttered griddle or large nonstick skillet.  Cook 3 to 4 minutes or until tops are covered with bubbles and edges look dry.  Turn and cook 3 to 4 minutes or until done.  Place in single layer on a baking sheet, and keep warm in a 200 degree oven up to 30 minutes.

Caramel Syrup:

Melt ½ cup butter in a heavy saucepan over medium heat; add 1 cup sugar and 1 tsp fresh lemon juice, and cook, stirring constantly, 5 to 6 minutes or until mixture turns a caramel color.  Gradually add ¾ cup whipping cream and cook, stirring constantly, 1 to 2 minutes or until smooth.  Serve immediately, or store in an airtight container in refrigerator up to 1 week.  Makes 1¾ cups.  To reheat:  microwave in a microwave-safe bowl at HIGH 10 to 15 seconds or just until warm; stir until smooth.

December 2012, Southern Living Volume 47.

BOOTHBAY HODGDON ISLAND INN COUNTDOWN TO CLOSING, EASTER AND CARAMEL CAKE PANCAKES

March 5th, 2014 by richard-pamela-riley

Hodgdon Island Inn under new ownership and closed for 2014 season

Hodgdon Island Inn under new ownership and closed for 2014 season

 As many of you know, Richard and I have sold the inn and as of March 24, 2014, we will be as our friends like to say “homeless and unemployed”.  :-)

It is truly an exciting, scary and fun time even though craziness abounds!  Days are whizzing by and important dates are fast approaching:  Fat Tuesday, Ash Wednesday, Easter and last, but definitely not least, Hodgdon Island Inn Closing.

In the midst of it all, we are researching and viewing properties not only here in Maine, but “down south” as well; we are sorting and packing (as evidenced by the ever-growing wall of boxes); developing a business plan for our next adventure and we are saying “thank you” to friends, neighbors, guests and business associates – all of whom we have become very attached to!

Tomorrow we will be viewing a property for the second time (HII Alumni clue:  the town is crossed by US Route 1 and state routes 52 and 105.  It borders the towns of Rockport to the south, Hope to the southwest, and Lincolnville to the north). 

Tomorrow is also Ash Wednesday.  Having been raised by Catholics and Anglicans, I was taught that Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent in the Western Christian calendar (directly following Shrove Tuesday).  Ash Wednesday occurs 46 days before Easter and as it is a moveable feast it can fall as early as February 4 and as late as March 10.

Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of this 40-day liturgical period of prayer and fasting or abstinence. Of the 46 days until Easter, six are Sundays. As a child, this fact was very important because as the Christian Sabbath, Sundays, are not included in the fasting period and are instead “feast” days during Lent.  Ash Wednesday derives its name from the practice of placing ashes on the foreheads of adherents as a celebration and reminder of human mortality, and as a sign of mourning and repentance to God. (The ashes used are typically gathered from the burning of the palms from the previous year’s Palm Sunday.)  The imposition of ashes on Ash Wednesday has been historically observed by Anglican, Catholic, and Lutheran Christians. It has also become a standard practice in the Methodist Church.

So where am I going with all of this you ask?  Well, if tomorrow is Ash Wednesday, then that means today is Shrove Tuesday or Fat Tuesday, or in our house it is known as Pancake Tuesday, and that means pancakes for supper!  Yum!  Because as we all know, pancakes are associated with the day preceding Lent because they were a way to use up rich foods such as eggs, milk, and sugar, before the fasting season of the 40 days of Lent. (The liturgical fasting emphasized eating plainer food and refraining from food that would give pleasure: in many cultures, this means no meat, dairy products, or eggs).

Caramel Cake Pancakes with Caramel Sauce

Caramel Cake Pancakes with Caramel Sauce

Tonight it’s Caramel Cake Pancakes with Caramel Syrup here at Hodgdon Island Inn and tomorrow it’s Fish & Chips at the King Eider Pub in Damariscotta.  Be sure to check the Hodgdon Island Inn Blog for the recipe  http://www.boothbaybb.com/blog

HODGDON ISLAND INN BED & BREAKFAST BOOTHBAY HARBOR REGION PANCAKES AND BLIZZARDS

February 10th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

HII Blizzard 2013 photographed by Richard B. RileyToday is Day 2 of the Blizzard of 2013 or as The Weather Channel has dubbed it, “Winter Storm Nemo”.  Richard and I are sending good thoughts to fellow New Englanders affected by the blizzard.  We also say “thanks” to all of our friends, neighbors and Hodgdon Island Inn Alumni who have been keeping us in their thoughts and prayers – we greatly appreciate the love and concern.

Whether you choose to call it “the blizzard” or  “Winter Storm Nemo” it doesn’t alter the fact that we are dealing with virtual whiteout conditions, excessive winds, massive amounts of snow, and huge drifts – first to the south and then to the north! Needless to say, Richard and I are having a delightful day in.

Richard has started painting again.  I love watching him as he brings the images on canvas to life.  In the background we are listening to some of our favorite DVDs (mostly British dramas and/or mysteries, and okay, yes, the odd episode of Downtown Abbey).  And me you ask?  What am I doing?  Well, I am curled up on the exquisite down-filled chaise lounge reading.  Reading what you ask?!  I am trading back and forth from cookbook (Ina Garten) to Kindle (yes, I’m afraid I’ve succumbed to technology) and to an old, but much loved, paperback copy of Lilian Jackson Braun’s The Cat Who Saw Red.

In The Cat Who Saw Red, the hero, a newspaperman named James McIntosh Qwilleran, has been given a new assignment of “food reviewer” for his imaginary newspaper, The Daily Fluxion. I have to admit it’s making me hungry – hence the switch to the cookbook.  And what does one make for dinner in the middle of a blizzard?!

Answer:  pancakes!  Yum!  So that starting me thinking about pancakes – you know – where did they come from? How long have they been around, etc?  So, here are a few fun facts:

1)       Archaeological evidence suggests that pancakes are probably the earliest and most widespread cereal food eaten in prehistoric societies

2)       The Oxford English Dictionary records the word flapjack as being used as early as the beginning of the 17th century, referring to a flat tart or pan-cake.

3)       The terms pancake and flapjack are often confused and today in the US are nearly synonymous.

4)       A flapjack is a thick small pancake, generally around 10 cm in diameter. Flapjacks are often served in a stack with syrup and butter, which can be accompanied by bacon or sausages.

5)       Shakespeare refers to pancakes in All’s Well That Ends Well and to flap-jacks in Pericles, Prince of Tyre: “Come, thou shant go home, and we’ll have flesh for holidays, fish for fasting-days, and moreo’er puddings and flap-jacks, and thou shalt be welcome.”Act II Scene I

6)       German pancakes or Dutch baby pancakes are bowl-shaped. They are eaten with lemons and powdered sugar, jam, fresh fruit or caramelized apples.

7)       In Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, pancakes are traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday, which is also known as “Pancake Day” and, particularly in Ireland and Scotland, as “Pancake Tuesday”. (Shrove Tuesday is better known in the United States, France and other countries as Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday). Pancake Tuesday is the day preceding Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent.  Historically, pancakes were made on Shrove Tuesday so that the last of the fatty and rich foods such as eggs, milk and sugar could be used up before fasting began at the start of Lent.

Hmmm, well, I think it’s going to be …