Posts Tagged ‘Boothbay Harbor Bed and Breakfast’

HODGDON ISLAND INN BED AND BREAKFAST NEAR BOOTHBAY HARBOR OPEN FOR MAINE’S FOLIAGE SEASON – REPORTS SUGGEST THIS YEAR’S SEASON ON TAP TO BE ONE OF THE BEST EVER

September 22nd, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

The  official start of the fall foliage season began last week here in Maine. The
2013 Fall Foliage Report from the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry reports that the northernmost part of the state is experiencing subtle color changes of less than 30% with very low leaf drop at less than 10%.  However, the state anticipates an outstanding foliage season according to the  Maine Forest Service.

An explosion of color!

An explosion of color!

“The native maples, particularly the red and sugar maples, which are
considered to provide the great backdrop of seasonal color, have vigorous,
healthy foliage with no notable problems. Given our moderate summer weather,
and allowing for this trend into the fall, I expect an outstanding vibrant
show, overall,” said Bill Ostrofsky, forest pathologist for the Maine
Forest Service.

Maine Forest Service rangers and state park rangers in Aroostook County and
northern Penobscot and Piscataquis Counties are reporting subtle changes in the
foliage with peak conditions still weeks away.

As overnight temperatures drop into the 40s and daylight decreases, rangers
expect a gradual change in leaf color from north to south culminating in peak
conditions in late October.

For continuous weekly updates every Wednesday through October 16th, visit the
state’s official foliage website www.mainefoliage.com.
The web site will also list dates, times and locations for fall foliage hikes
in the state parks as the season progresses. Visitors can sign up to receive
weekly reports by e-mails while sharing their photos of the vibrant color
throughout the state as the leaves slowly change on the Maine Fall Foliage page
on Facebook. Additionally, the foliage website will list the fall foliage
ranger-led hikes in the state parks.

Hodgdon Island Inn is a nine-room inn located on the quiet side of Boothbay and about 15 minutes from downtown Boothbay Harbor.  The inn is close to several nature preserves and the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens.  Reservations can be made online at http://www.boothbaybb.com or by calling 1-800-314-5160.  Be sure to check out the Fall Foliage Special as well – stay three nights and the third night is half off!

BOOTHBAY MAINE B&B HODGDON ISLAND INN RECOGNIZED BY TRIPADVISOR

July 6th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

2013 Trip Advisor Certificate of ExcellenceTripAdvisor is delighted to recognize The Hodgdon Island Inn with a 2013 Certificate of Excellence.

This prestigious award, which places HII in the top-performing 10% of all businesses worldwide on TripAdvisor, is given to businesses that consistently earn high ratings from TripAdvisor travelers.

Hodgdon Island Inn has received this distinction for four consecutive years and is rated by TripAdvisor travelers as the Number 1 B&B in Boothbay, Maine.

The inn offers ultra-comfortable beds, private baths, in-room refrigerators, hair dryers, air-conditioners, water views; free WiFi; secure on-site parking; and a heated in-ground swimming pool (Memorial Day – Columbus Day, weather permitting).

A stay at the inn includes a full gourmet breakfast each morning and fresh homemade desserts every evening.

Hodgdon Island Inn is located within walking distance of several Boothbay Region Land Trust Preserves as well as one of the most distinguished botanical destinations in the country – the 250 acre Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens.

 Hodgdon Island Inn is located about an hour northeast of Portland; an hour south of Camden or three hours from Boston or Bar Harbor.

HODGDON ISLAND INN OFFERS QUICK AND EASY DESSERT RECIPE FOR FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATIONS

July 3rd, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Chocolate Chip Shortbread Cookies photo by Richard B. RileyCHOCOLATE CHIP SHORTBREADS

(A Quick and Easy Dessert)

 

From the kitchen of Pamela Byrne Riley

Hodgdon Island Inn, Boothbay, Maine

Makes twelve heart cookies

INGREDIENTS:

1 c plus 2 TBS all-purpose flour

½ c cold unsalted butter

1/3 c semisweet chocolate mini chips (I prefer Ghiradelli)

¼ c granulated sugar

DIRECTIONS:

Heat oven to 325 degrees.  Have shortbread cookie molds ready.

Mix flour and granulated sugar in a medium bowl.  Cut in butter with a pastry blender (or rub butter in with fingertips) until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.  Stir in mini chips.

Gently press crumbs together to form a dough (heat from your hands will help make this happen).  Press dough into mold sections.  Prick sections twice with a fork.

Bake 20 -25 minutes, or until shortbread looks dry and golden at edges.  Allow to cool in molds completely before removing.

Shortbreads can be stored airtight at room temperature for up to 3 days.

Nutrition facts:  117 cals., 7 g total fat, 16 mg chol., 2 mg sodium, 12 g carb., 1 g fiber, 1 g protein.

Recipe found in Woman’s Day, 2005

BOOTHBAY BED AND BREAKFAST HODGDON ISLAND INN CELEBRATES WINDJAMMER DAYS

June 22nd, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Windjammers!

Windjammers!

Windjammer Days 2013

11 Windjammers sail into the harbor

Submitted

By

Boothbay Harbor Region Chamber of Commerce

11 tall ships will be at this year’s Windjammer Days Festival, according to the Boothbay Harbor Region Chamber of Commerce. The 2013 Windjammer Days is scheduled to take place June 25 and 26, with the schooners appearing in Linekin Bay on Tuesday the 25th and in the harbor on Wednesday, June 26.

The Windjammers include:Windjammer Days Boothbay Harbor photographed Richard B. Riley

American Eagle: A deep draft vessel designed to be safe and stable in open water. The schooner was the last New England fishing schooner engaged in commercial fishing and is captained by Perry Davis and Bethany Mcnelly-Davis. This schooner does 2, 4 and 6 hour charters along with “Island Adventure” trips to explore islands in Casco Bay from Bailey Island.

Alert: The schooner was the last New England fishing schooner engaged in commercial fishing and is now captained by Perry Davis and Bethany Mcnelly-Davis. This schooner does 2, 4 and 6 hour charters along with “Island Adventure” trips to explore islands in Casco Bay from Bailey Island.

Bowdoin: The Bowdoin is the official vessel of the state of Maine and a national historic landmark. It was was built in East Boothbay by Hodgdon Brothers (now Hodgdon Yachts) in 1921. Owned and operated by Maine Maritime Academy, the schooner provides a platform for students to demonstrate competencies in vessel operations and technology. Captain of the Bowdoin is Eric Jergenson. For more, visit www.mainemaritime.edu.

Nathaniel Bowditch: Built as a racing yacht in 1922 in East Boothbay, this 82′ schooner won special class honors in the Bermuda Race in 1923, and served in the Coast Guard during World War II. Owen and Cathie Dorr are the captains. This schooner offers may specialty cruises such as Sail and State Parks Package. For more, visit www.windjammervacation.com.

Eastwind: Herb and Doris Smith sailed around the world twice with their three children on schooners they built by hand; Eastwind is one of the schooners they built. Tom and Jennifer Smith are the owners and captains of the Eastwind. The Eastwind offers two-hour voyages out of Boothbay Harbor. For more, visit www.schoonereastwind.com.

Lazy Jack: A topsail schooner when fully rigged can carry up to eight sails; Lazy Jack sailed for 20 years from Massachusetts to Cuba carrying various cargo for her master. Joe Tassi is the captain. The Lazy Jack offers a two hour day sail or private charter adventures. For more, visit www.schoonerlazyjackcruises.com.

Lewis R. French: Launched in 1871 in Christmas Cove, Maine, the Lewis R. French is the oldest vessel in the fleet and the oldest commercial sailing vessel in the USA. Garth Wells and Jenny Tobin are the captains. This schooner offers 3, 4, 5 and 6 night excursions. For more, visit www.schoonerfrench.com.

Timberwind: This schooner is family-owned and operated and last year raced in “Jammers & Joggers.” Bob Tassi is the captain. The Timberwind offers 3, 4, and 6 day windjammer cruises. For more, visit www.schoonertimberwind.com.

Heritage: This ship was designed and built by Captains Doug and Linda Lee. The Heritage offers 3, 4, and 6 day windjammer cruises. For more, visit www.schoonerheritage.com.

Sherman Zwicker: Built in 1942, this schooner is the last remaining auxiliary fishing schooner and has all of its main original features still intact and operational. George McEvoy is the captain of this fully operational, traveling museum. For more, visit www.schoonermuseum.org.

Windfield Lash: The two-masted schooner was launched in 2000 after 18 years of hard labor to bring it to fruition. The captain is Dave Clarke. This schooner’s homeport is Friendship and cruises in Maine in the summer.

The annual Windjammer Days Festival will feature its classic line-up of events, which include a One Design Boat Race; Windjammer Days Golf Tournament fundraiser for Community Fireworks, the hometown street parade; an antique boat parade of more than 30 boats; second annual Artists Alley; 10 waterfront concerts; tours of the USCG and Maine State Aquarium; Kid’s tent; 2-day craft show; boat excursions; and a spectacular firework display over the harbor. Visitors can enjoy a complimentary 2-day shuttle during the festival.

To learn more about Windjammer Days and to track updates, visit www.boothbayharbor.com or find the Chamber on Facebook.

HODGDON ISLAND INN B&B NEAR BOOTHBAY HARBOR SHARES EASY RECIPE FOR MEMORIAL DAY TREATS

May 24th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Honey-Baked Wonton Napoleons Honey Glazed Wonton Napoleon

Honey-Baked Wonton Napoleons – Stack honey-glazed wonton wrappers with sweetened cream cheese, blueberries, and strawberries to make this incredible dessert in less than 30 minutes.

Ingredients:

Wontons:

¼ c honey

24 refrigerated wonton wrappers

Filling:

1 tub (8 oz) spreadable cream cheese, at room temperature

2 TBS honey

½ tsp vanilla extract

Berries:

1 pint strawberries, hulled and thinly sliced

1 pint blueberries

Directions:  Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line two baking sheets with non stick aluminum foil, or line the baking sheets with regular aluminum foil coated with nonstick cooking spray.

Wontons: In microwave-safe bowl, microwave honey at 100% power to liquefy, 20-30 seconds.  Brush one side of each wonton with honey.  Place wontons, honey side up, on prepared sheets.

Bake in 400 degree oven until nicely browned (about 7 minutes).  Transfer wontons to wire rack; let cool completely.

Filling:  In bowl, beat cream cheese, honey, vanilla until smooth.

To assemble:  Place 1 wonton on serving dish; spread with 1 TBS filling.  Top with sliced berries. Place second wonton on top; spread 1 TBS filling.  Top with blueberries.  Top the third wonton.  Garnish with sliced strawberries and blueberries.  Repeat with remaining ingredients for a total of 8 napoleons.

Maine Bed and Breakfast Innkeepers Share Fast, Fun and Easy Foods to Play with on St. Patrick’s Day

March 16th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

“This St. Patrick’s Day go ahead and play with your food” advises innkeeper Pamela Byrne Riley of Hodgdon Island Inn, Boothbay, Maine.  Pamela, first generation American-born of Irish ancestry, loves March 17th!

Here are a few of Pamela’s quick and easy ideas to fun up mealtimes on the big day:

Shamrock Toast for St. Patrick's Day photo by Richard B.RileyShamrock cookie cutters make cute cutouts for toast, PB&Js, scones, French toast, or croutons.  You can even put little hands to work cutting the shamrocks out of slices of bread.

Shamrock toast – cut out shapes and toast under the broiler or pop in toaster.  Top with butter and cinnamon sugar or your favorite jam or honey.

Pesto toasts – cut out shapes and toast under the broiler, then top with your favorite brand of prepared pesto.  Serve on steaming bowls of potato soup.  Pesto Toasts photo by Richard B. Riley

Scones or biscuits – make your favorite recipe and cut shamrock shapes instead of the round or triangle shape.  Bake as directed.

Yum!  Have a great St. Paddy’s Day!

 

 

B&B INNKEEPER NEAR BOOTHBAY HARBOR CELEBRATES IRISH HERITAGE

March 16th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Irish Soda Bread Sunday is St. Patrick’s Day.  March 17th has been a national holiday for me since I was old enough to know anything (which my mother claims was two minutes after birth, but I digress).

My mother, Sheila, was from a seaside harbor town in County Dublin, Ireland, called Dun Laoghaire (pronounced Done Leary).  After her father died she left Ireland and went to London, England to find work to help support her family and survived a world war.  In due course she traveled to America where she met my father, Bill; became an American citizen and had me.

America was her home, but Ireland was where she came from and every year on St. Patrick’s Day we celebrated that fact.  It was fun!  We would go to church; we would have lamb stew or corned beef and cabbage or potato soup; soda bread and scones warm from the oven slathered with butter or clotted cream and jam and always lots and lots of hot tea poured from a china teapot into delicate china cups on saucers laced with milk and sugar.  Mommy would sing, I would dance (yes, I am a medal-winning Irish step-dancer), family and friends would join in with their own songs and stories and my Pop – well, he would preside over all the festivities and try and look like as if it was all a big fuss about nothing, but his eyes – his bright blue eyes would be smiling.  And you know that saying “when Irish eyes are smiling …”  :-)

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to one and all!

P.S. Need an easy recipe for Irish soda bread?  Check out one of our family recipes:  http://boothbaybb.com/blog/page5/

HODGDON ISLAND INN BED & BREAKFAST BOOTHBAY HARBOR REGION PANCAKES AND BLIZZARDS

February 10th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

HII Blizzard 2013 photographed by Richard B. RileyToday is Day 2 of the Blizzard of 2013 or as The Weather Channel has dubbed it, “Winter Storm Nemo”.  Richard and I are sending good thoughts to fellow New Englanders affected by the blizzard.  We also say “thanks” to all of our friends, neighbors and Hodgdon Island Inn Alumni who have been keeping us in their thoughts and prayers – we greatly appreciate the love and concern.

Whether you choose to call it “the blizzard” or  “Winter Storm Nemo” it doesn’t alter the fact that we are dealing with virtual whiteout conditions, excessive winds, massive amounts of snow, and huge drifts – first to the south and then to the north! Needless to say, Richard and I are having a delightful day in.

Richard has started painting again.  I love watching him as he brings the images on canvas to life.  In the background we are listening to some of our favorite DVDs (mostly British dramas and/or mysteries, and okay, yes, the odd episode of Downtown Abbey).  And me you ask?  What am I doing?  Well, I am curled up on the exquisite down-filled chaise lounge reading.  Reading what you ask?!  I am trading back and forth from cookbook (Ina Garten) to Kindle (yes, I’m afraid I’ve succumbed to technology) and to an old, but much loved, paperback copy of Lilian Jackson Braun’s The Cat Who Saw Red.

In The Cat Who Saw Red, the hero, a newspaperman named James McIntosh Qwilleran, has been given a new assignment of “food reviewer” for his imaginary newspaper, The Daily Fluxion. I have to admit it’s making me hungry – hence the switch to the cookbook.  And what does one make for dinner in the middle of a blizzard?!

Answer:  pancakes!  Yum!  So that starting me thinking about pancakes – you know – where did they come from? How long have they been around, etc?  So, here are a few fun facts:

1)       Archaeological evidence suggests that pancakes are probably the earliest and most widespread cereal food eaten in prehistoric societies

2)       The Oxford English Dictionary records the word flapjack as being used as early as the beginning of the 17th century, referring to a flat tart or pan-cake.

3)       The terms pancake and flapjack are often confused and today in the US are nearly synonymous.

4)       A flapjack is a thick small pancake, generally around 10 cm in diameter. Flapjacks are often served in a stack with syrup and butter, which can be accompanied by bacon or sausages.

5)       Shakespeare refers to pancakes in All’s Well That Ends Well and to flap-jacks in Pericles, Prince of Tyre: “Come, thou shant go home, and we’ll have flesh for holidays, fish for fasting-days, and moreo’er puddings and flap-jacks, and thou shalt be welcome.”Act II Scene I

6)       German pancakes or Dutch baby pancakes are bowl-shaped. They are eaten with lemons and powdered sugar, jam, fresh fruit or caramelized apples.

7)       In Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, pancakes are traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday, which is also known as “Pancake Day” and, particularly in Ireland and Scotland, as “Pancake Tuesday”. (Shrove Tuesday is better known in the United States, France and other countries as Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday). Pancake Tuesday is the day preceding Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent.  Historically, pancakes were made on Shrove Tuesday so that the last of the fatty and rich foods such as eggs, milk and sugar could be used up before fasting began at the start of Lent.

Hmmm, well, I think it’s going to be …

DUTCH BABY or OVEN PANCAKE RECIPE

February 10th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Dutch baby photo by Richard B. Riley

Serve this straight from the oven with a dusting of powdered sugar, a spoonful of your favorite fruit jam or preserves, or a drizzle of real Maine maple syrup for a taste of pure perfection!

From the kitchen of Pamela Byrne Riley

Photographed by Richard B. Riley

Innkeepers, Hodgdon Island Inn, Boothbay, Maine

 

Ingredients:

1/2c milk

1/2c all-purpose flour

1/4c sugar

2 large eggs at room temperature

4 TBS unsalted butter

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees

Whisk together until smooth all ingredients except the butter; set aside

Melt butter in a 10-inch oven proof skillet (cast iron is ideal; if using pan other than cast iron, be sure to cover handle completely with aluminum foil) over medium heat.

Tilt pan so that the butter coats the sides.  Pour the egg mixture into the skillet and cook without stirring, for 1 minute.

Place the skillet in the oven and bake until the pancake is puffed and golden, 12 to 15 minutes.

“Serve immediately”, advises Irma Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker and Ethan Becker of Joy of Cooking fame, “as the pancake loses its puff, and therefore its drama almost immediately”.

Makes 2-4 servings.

HODGDON ISLAND INN NEAR BOOTHBAY HARBOR MAINE SENDS CHINESE NEW YEAR GREETINGS

February 7th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

The most important holiday for Chinese around the world is undoubtedly Chinese New Year — and it all started out of fear.

The centuries-old legend on the origins of the New Year celebration varies from teller to teller, but they all include a story of a terrible mythical monster who preyed on villagers. The lion-like monster’s name was Nian (年) which is also the Chinese word for “year.”

The stories also all include a wise old man who counsels the villagers to ward off the evil Nian by making loud noises with drums and firecrackers and hanging red paper cutouts and scrolls on their doors because for some reason, the Nian is scared of the color red.

The villagers took the old man’s advice and the Nian was conquered. On the anniversary of the date, the Chinese recognize the “passing of the Nian” known in Chinese as guo nian (过年), which is also synonymous with celebrating the New Year.

2013 is the year of the Snake!

2013 is the year of the Snake!

The date of Chinese New Year changes each year as it is based on the lunar calendar. While the western Gregorian calendar is based on the earth’s orbit around the sun, China and most Asian countries use the lunar calendar that is based on the moon’s orbit around the earth. Chinese New Year always falls on the second new moon after the winter solstice. Other Asian countries such as Korea, Japan and Vietnam also celebrate New Year using the lunar calendar.

This year’s presiding animal zodiac is the Snake.  Richard was born in the year of the Dragon, the most revered of all the animal zodiac figures and yours truly was born in the year of the Monkey (reported to be the cleverest of the animal zodiac figures) :-)

We wish one and all the happiness of the season!