Archive for the ‘B&B Boothbay Harbor’ Category

IN BOOTHBAY ON HODGDON ISLAND INNKEEPERS CELEBRATE J.R.R. TOLKIEN AND SECOND BREAKFAST

March 23rd, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Ten years ago on March 25th, The Tolkien Society launched its first annual Tolkien Reading Day – a day set aside to honor the writer J.R.R. Tolkien and to encourage the reading of his works.  How fun is that?!  To have another excuse to read some of my favorite all time stories?!Tolkien Reading Day

Richard and I are avid readers and we owe our parents a huge debt of gratitude for encouraging us in this habit of a lifetime.  Both sets of parents loved to read and we were both treated to hours and hours of magic time involving the sound of our parents’ voices reading aloud from the pages of our favorite books:  Tolkien’s The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, or The Silmarillion; Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass; C.S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia; L. Frank Baum’s Oz books and of course J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan.  Fantasy at its best.  (AUDIBLE SIGH).

Fantasies that we have carried with us so long that they have involved into a certain kind of reality.  I mean, some days don’t we all think “I don’t want to grow up”? or “wish I had a bucket of water to melt the wicked witch” or “can’t I just disappear down that rabbit hole”?  And of course, the all-time favorite: “what about second breakfast?!”

In J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, the hero, Bilbo Baggins (hobbit extraordinaire), eats second breakfast.  In the preface to its sequel, The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien mentions that the hobbits’ preference is to eat six meals a day.   In Peter Jackson’s film adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring, Pippin, one of the hobbits, in a dialogue with Merry, another of the hobbits, references both second breakfast and elvenses while on the run and under the protection of the human, Aragorn.

Aragorn: Gentlemen, we do not stop ’til nightfall.
Pippin: What about breakfast?
Aragorn: You’ve already had it.
Pippin: We’ve had one, yes. What about second breakfast?
[Aragorn turns and walks off in disgust]
Merry: I don’t think he knows about second breakfast, Pip.
Pippin: What about elevenses? Luncheon? Afternoon tea? Dinner? Supper? He knows about them, doesn’t he?
Merry: I wouldn’t count on it.
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According to tradition in the United Kingdom and Ireland elevenses is a snack that is similar to afternoon tea, but eaten in the latter part of the morning.  It could include cake, cookies, scones or tarts with a cup of tea, coffee or hot chocolate. The name refers to the time of day that it is taken: around 11AM.

If you have occasion to celebrate a second breakfast in the true style of J.R.R. Tolkien’s hobbits, be sure to check out the 75th anniversary “Hobbit Second Breakfast Kit” at www.hobbitsecondbreakfast.com

Here at Hodgdon Island Inn we do our very best to not only meet our guests’ every dietary need, but to serve a breakfast sumptuous enough to get you through elevenses all the way to luncheon.

Happy Reading!

HODGDON ISLAND INN B&B BOOTHBAY REGION SHARES GOOD NEWS ABOUT MAINE LOBSTER FISHERY

March 18th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Maine lobster fishery awarded prestigious international certification

Submitted

By

Maine Department of Marine Resources

Maine’s Govenor,Lobster boat Hodgdon Island Maine photo by Richard B. Riley Paul R. LePage , while attending the 2013 International Boston Seafood Show, announced that the iconic Maine lobster fishery has received the prestigious international Marine Stewardship Council’s Sustainable Seafood Certification. MSC certification recognizes ecologically sound practices, from the harvest through delivery to consumer. Certification provides a competitive advantage in marketing to the growing number of retailers and consumers around the world who place a premium on seafood harvested in an environmentally responsible, sustainable manner.

“The Marine Stewardship Council’s certification will provide the Maine lobster industry with a globally-recognized seal of approval,” the governor said. “This certification recognizes our longstanding practices of good stewardship and ensures that every lobster caught in Maine waters can be marketed not only as delicious, healthy food, but also as a resource that meets the most stringent international environmental standard for seafood sustainability.”

The MSC certification program includes a process for tracing each certified lobster to its location of origin, Maine waters, which is key  to protecting the Maine brand.

Lobster traps Boothbay Harbor Maine photo by Richard B. Riley

The history of Maine lobsters starts with James Rosier, who chronicled the Waymouth expedition of 1605. Near Burnt Island in Muscongus Bay, Rosier reported, “With a small net…very nigh the shore, we got about thirty very good and great Lobsters.”

There are several places along the coast of Maine where you can visit displays about different aspects of lobstering including the Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, the Department of Marine Resources Aquarium in Boothbay, the Ira C. Darling Center on the Damariscotta River, and the Mount Desert Oceanarium in Southwest Harbor. Rockland’s lobster festival on the first weekend of August serves up ten tons of lobsters.

Maine Bed and Breakfast Innkeepers Share Fast, Fun and Easy Foods to Play with on St. Patrick’s Day

March 16th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

“This St. Patrick’s Day go ahead and play with your food” advises innkeeper Pamela Byrne Riley of Hodgdon Island Inn, Boothbay, Maine.  Pamela, first generation American-born of Irish ancestry, loves March 17th!

Here are a few of Pamela’s quick and easy ideas to fun up mealtimes on the big day:

Shamrock Toast for St. Patrick's Day photo by Richard B.RileyShamrock cookie cutters make cute cutouts for toast, PB&Js, scones, French toast, or croutons.  You can even put little hands to work cutting the shamrocks out of slices of bread.

Shamrock toast – cut out shapes and toast under the broiler or pop in toaster.  Top with butter and cinnamon sugar or your favorite jam or honey.

Pesto toasts – cut out shapes and toast under the broiler, then top with your favorite brand of prepared pesto.  Serve on steaming bowls of potato soup.  Pesto Toasts photo by Richard B. Riley

Scones or biscuits – make your favorite recipe and cut shamrock shapes instead of the round or triangle shape.  Bake as directed.

Yum!  Have a great St. Paddy’s Day!

 

 

B&B INNKEEPER NEAR BOOTHBAY HARBOR CELEBRATES IRISH HERITAGE

March 16th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Irish Soda Bread Sunday is St. Patrick’s Day.  March 17th has been a national holiday for me since I was old enough to know anything (which my mother claims was two minutes after birth, but I digress).

My mother, Sheila, was from a seaside harbor town in County Dublin, Ireland, called Dun Laoghaire (pronounced Done Leary).  After her father died she left Ireland and went to London, England to find work to help support her family and survived a world war.  In due course she traveled to America where she met my father, Bill; became an American citizen and had me.

America was her home, but Ireland was where she came from and every year on St. Patrick’s Day we celebrated that fact.  It was fun!  We would go to church; we would have lamb stew or corned beef and cabbage or potato soup; soda bread and scones warm from the oven slathered with butter or clotted cream and jam and always lots and lots of hot tea poured from a china teapot into delicate china cups on saucers laced with milk and sugar.  Mommy would sing, I would dance (yes, I am a medal-winning Irish step-dancer), family and friends would join in with their own songs and stories and my Pop – well, he would preside over all the festivities and try and look like as if it was all a big fuss about nothing, but his eyes – his bright blue eyes would be smiling.  And you know that saying “when Irish eyes are smiling …”  :-)

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to one and all!

P.S. Need an easy recipe for Irish soda bread?  Check out one of our family recipes:  http://boothbaybb.com/blog/page5/

HODGDON ISLAND INN BED & BREAKFAST BOOTHBAY REGION OPENS FOR SEASON MARCH 1, 2013

March 1st, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Richard and I are looking forward to our fourth season as innkeepers here at Hodgdon Island Inn!  We join the Boothbay Harbor Region Chamber of Commerce in inviting you to come to not only our own little island getaway, but our lovely region as well where you can “relax, rejuvenate and reconnect in our friendly coastal community”.

Springtime Hodgdon ISland Inn photo by Richard B. RileyHodgdon Island Inn, located on the quiet side of Boothbay Harbor, is surrounded by deep water, nature preserves, hiking trails, Maine’s one and only botanical gardens, and one of the best places to launch a kayak in the area!  Our nine rooms have water views, fans and air-conditioners, our beds are comfy, our breakfasts sumptuous, our evening desserts decadent, our in-ground pool heated, our parking lot secure and your hosts love to pamper and spoil their guests!  Front row seats are available for rest and relaxation and the Trevett General Store, just across the road, is the place to get beer, wine and sodas along with the area’s best Lobster rolls, Whoopie Pies, chowders and even fish & chips.

If you are thinking about getting away for a few days to Maine this spring, here are some upcoming events in the Boothbay Harbor Region that you may want to add to your list:Waffles & Maine Maple Syrup Photo by Richard B. Riley

Maine Maple Syrup Sunday, March 24. This statewide event is sponsored by the Maine Maple Producers Association. They welcome you to join them as they celebrate the history and significance of Maine produced and harvested maple syrup. Most sugarhouses offer free maple syrup samples and demonstrations on how pure Maine maple syrup is made. Many farms offer games, activities, treats, sugar bush tours, music, and so much more.

http://www.mainemapleproducers.com/maine-maple-sunday-map.html

Fisherman's Festival Boothbay Harbor Photo by Richard B. RileyFisherman’s Festival and Blessing of the Fleet the weekend of April 26-28 in Boothbay Harbor.  This long standing, annual celebration includes the Miss Shrimp Contest, trap hauling, codfish relay, fish fry, lobster crate races, tug-o-wars, church suppers, lobster bakes, popular bands, and more. The Blessing of the Fleet, Memorial Service and boat parade are on Sunday. Admission is free. http://chamber.boothbayharbor.com/events/details/fisherman-s-festival-5146/

Mother’s Day Weekend, May10-12.  If you’re looking for ways to spoil Mom this weekend, then Boothbay is the place to come!   We’re offering everything from days in the gardens, shopping and harbor cruises to champagne cocktails.

National Public Gardens Day 2013 Maine Photo by Richard B. Riley

Saturday, May 11 is the perfect time to take in the uniqueness of nearby Boothbay Harbor with all its amenities.  And on Mom’s Day, Sunday, May 12 at Hodgdon Island Inn, all moms and their companions are treated to a very special Mother’s Day breakfast complete with flowers and a champagne cocktail.

Hodgdon Island Inn is the closest Boothbay B B to the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens (http://www.mainegardens.com )

RESERVATIONS at Hodgdon Island Inn can be made year round online at http://www.boothbaybb.com by clicking on the Availability/Reservation line or by calling your hosts, Pamela Byrne Riley & Richard B. Riley, at 1-800-314-5160.  Hodgdon Island Inn is open March through November.

HODGDON ISLAND INN BOOTHBAY BB FAVORITE VALENTINE’S DAY CHOCOLATE DESSERT RECIPE – FAST, EASY & FUN

February 14th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

RICH & EASY DARK CHOCOLATE POTS

Chocolate Pots for Valentine's Day photo by Richard B. RileyFrom the kitchen of Pamela Byrne Riley

Photo by Richard B. Riley

Innkeepers, Hodgdon Island Inn

Boothbay, Maine

Total time:  10 minutes

Makes 6 servings

 

INGREDIENTS:

3oz Stone Ground TAZA dark chocolate* or 4oz Baker’s German Sweet Chocolate

11/3 c  heavy cream

1 TBS  orange liqueur

1 egg, lightly beaten

 

DIRECTIONS:

Bring cream to a boil, make sure it doesn’t burn

Break chocolate into small pieces, put in blender

Pour cream over the chocolate, blend until chocolate is dissolved

Beat egg with fork, add liqueur while stirring egg slightly, add to chocolate mixture and blend until incorporated

Pour into Espresso cups and refrigerate until set

Garnish with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate shavings or a chocolate covered coffee bean if desired.

*TAZA Chocolate is Dairy Free, Gluten free and Soy Free.

Food.com recipe

HODGDON ISLAND INN BED & BREAKFAST BOOTHBAY HARBOR REGION PANCAKES AND BLIZZARDS

February 10th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

HII Blizzard 2013 photographed by Richard B. RileyToday is Day 2 of the Blizzard of 2013 or as The Weather Channel has dubbed it, “Winter Storm Nemo”.  Richard and I are sending good thoughts to fellow New Englanders affected by the blizzard.  We also say “thanks” to all of our friends, neighbors and Hodgdon Island Inn Alumni who have been keeping us in their thoughts and prayers – we greatly appreciate the love and concern.

Whether you choose to call it “the blizzard” or  “Winter Storm Nemo” it doesn’t alter the fact that we are dealing with virtual whiteout conditions, excessive winds, massive amounts of snow, and huge drifts – first to the south and then to the north! Needless to say, Richard and I are having a delightful day in.

Richard has started painting again.  I love watching him as he brings the images on canvas to life.  In the background we are listening to some of our favorite DVDs (mostly British dramas and/or mysteries, and okay, yes, the odd episode of Downtown Abbey).  And me you ask?  What am I doing?  Well, I am curled up on the exquisite down-filled chaise lounge reading.  Reading what you ask?!  I am trading back and forth from cookbook (Ina Garten) to Kindle (yes, I’m afraid I’ve succumbed to technology) and to an old, but much loved, paperback copy of Lilian Jackson Braun’s The Cat Who Saw Red.

In The Cat Who Saw Red, the hero, a newspaperman named James McIntosh Qwilleran, has been given a new assignment of “food reviewer” for his imaginary newspaper, The Daily Fluxion. I have to admit it’s making me hungry – hence the switch to the cookbook.  And what does one make for dinner in the middle of a blizzard?!

Answer:  pancakes!  Yum!  So that starting me thinking about pancakes – you know – where did they come from? How long have they been around, etc?  So, here are a few fun facts:

1)       Archaeological evidence suggests that pancakes are probably the earliest and most widespread cereal food eaten in prehistoric societies

2)       The Oxford English Dictionary records the word flapjack as being used as early as the beginning of the 17th century, referring to a flat tart or pan-cake.

3)       The terms pancake and flapjack are often confused and today in the US are nearly synonymous.

4)       A flapjack is a thick small pancake, generally around 10 cm in diameter. Flapjacks are often served in a stack with syrup and butter, which can be accompanied by bacon or sausages.

5)       Shakespeare refers to pancakes in All’s Well That Ends Well and to flap-jacks in Pericles, Prince of Tyre: “Come, thou shant go home, and we’ll have flesh for holidays, fish for fasting-days, and moreo’er puddings and flap-jacks, and thou shalt be welcome.”Act II Scene I

6)       German pancakes or Dutch baby pancakes are bowl-shaped. They are eaten with lemons and powdered sugar, jam, fresh fruit or caramelized apples.

7)       In Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, pancakes are traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday, which is also known as “Pancake Day” and, particularly in Ireland and Scotland, as “Pancake Tuesday”. (Shrove Tuesday is better known in the United States, France and other countries as Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday). Pancake Tuesday is the day preceding Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent.  Historically, pancakes were made on Shrove Tuesday so that the last of the fatty and rich foods such as eggs, milk and sugar could be used up before fasting began at the start of Lent.

Hmmm, well, I think it’s going to be …

DUTCH BABY or OVEN PANCAKE RECIPE

February 10th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Dutch baby photo by Richard B. Riley

Serve this straight from the oven with a dusting of powdered sugar, a spoonful of your favorite fruit jam or preserves, or a drizzle of real Maine maple syrup for a taste of pure perfection!

From the kitchen of Pamela Byrne Riley

Photographed by Richard B. Riley

Innkeepers, Hodgdon Island Inn, Boothbay, Maine

 

Ingredients:

1/2c milk

1/2c all-purpose flour

1/4c sugar

2 large eggs at room temperature

4 TBS unsalted butter

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees

Whisk together until smooth all ingredients except the butter; set aside

Melt butter in a 10-inch oven proof skillet (cast iron is ideal; if using pan other than cast iron, be sure to cover handle completely with aluminum foil) over medium heat.

Tilt pan so that the butter coats the sides.  Pour the egg mixture into the skillet and cook without stirring, for 1 minute.

Place the skillet in the oven and bake until the pancake is puffed and golden, 12 to 15 minutes.

“Serve immediately”, advises Irma Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker and Ethan Becker of Joy of Cooking fame, “as the pancake loses its puff, and therefore its drama almost immediately”.

Makes 2-4 servings.

HODGDON ISLAND INN NEAR BOOTHBAY HARBOR MAINE SENDS CHINESE NEW YEAR GREETINGS

February 7th, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

The most important holiday for Chinese around the world is undoubtedly Chinese New Year — and it all started out of fear.

The centuries-old legend on the origins of the New Year celebration varies from teller to teller, but they all include a story of a terrible mythical monster who preyed on villagers. The lion-like monster’s name was Nian (年) which is also the Chinese word for “year.”

The stories also all include a wise old man who counsels the villagers to ward off the evil Nian by making loud noises with drums and firecrackers and hanging red paper cutouts and scrolls on their doors because for some reason, the Nian is scared of the color red.

The villagers took the old man’s advice and the Nian was conquered. On the anniversary of the date, the Chinese recognize the “passing of the Nian” known in Chinese as guo nian (过年), which is also synonymous with celebrating the New Year.

2013 is the year of the Snake!

2013 is the year of the Snake!

The date of Chinese New Year changes each year as it is based on the lunar calendar. While the western Gregorian calendar is based on the earth’s orbit around the sun, China and most Asian countries use the lunar calendar that is based on the moon’s orbit around the earth. Chinese New Year always falls on the second new moon after the winter solstice. Other Asian countries such as Korea, Japan and Vietnam also celebrate New Year using the lunar calendar.

This year’s presiding animal zodiac is the Snake.  Richard was born in the year of the Dragon, the most revered of all the animal zodiac figures and yours truly was born in the year of the Monkey (reported to be the cleverest of the animal zodiac figures) :-)

We wish one and all the happiness of the season!

HODGDON ISLAND INN BOOTHBAY B&B CELEBRATES AMERICAN HEART MONTH

February 1st, 2013 by richard-pamela-riley

Show your support in the fight against America's #1 killer of women - wear red!

Show your support in the fight against America’s #1 killer of women – wear red!

Did you know that February is American Heart Month, and not because of Valentine’s Day? Every year since its congressional approval in 1963, the President has issued a proclamation to this effect, to help raise public awareness of heart disease.

“Heart disease takes the lives of far too many people in this country, depriving their families and communities of someone they love and care for—a father, a mother, a wife, a friend, a neighbor, a spouse. With more than 2 million heart attacks and strokes a year, and 800,000 deaths, just about all of us have been touched by someone who has had heart disease, heart attack, or a stroke.”
- Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius

February is American Heart Month, and unfortunately, most of us know someone who has or had heart disease or stroke. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States; one in every three deaths is from heart disease and stroke, equal to 2,200 deaths per day.

Here are some things we can all do to help our hearts:

  • Limit intake of fat
  • Choose heart-healthy fats over saturated fats and trans fats
  • Limit intake of sugars
  • Limit intake of sodium/salt
  • Choose more whole grains, legumes, fresh fruit and veggies and low fat dairy products
  • Choose lean meat and poultry
  • Include fish in our diet
  • Exercise portion control
  • Become physically active for 30 to 60 minutes a day
  • Stop smoking
  • Limit intake of alcohol

Even though most people associate heart disease with men, it’s also the leading cause of death among women. To raise awareness of this fact, the American Heart Association’s Go Red campaign aims to help women take action against heart disease. So please consider showing your support by wearing something red tomorrow on National Wear Red Day, Friday, February 1st.

For a heart healthy breakfast item, be sure to check out Hodgdon Island Inn’s “Heart-Healthy Parfait” recipe.